The Best Bike Ride in America

Rules of the Ride

The number one priority of Cycle Oregon is your safety. Therefore, here are a few rules we insist you follow:

  1. Only bicycles propelled exclusively by human power are allowed to participate in a Cycle Oregon sponsored event.
  2. Helmets and two water bottles (or equivalent) are required on Cycle Oregon. The use of rearview mirrors is recommended as a safety measure.
  3. Cycle Oregon uses a group of Safety Patrol volunteers on motorcycle who provide an on-course presence and are a good source of information or assistance during the ride. They enhance the overall safety of the ride by interacting with the riders who may pose a hazard by unlawful or unsafe riding. Heed their advice.
  4. By Oregon law, bicyclists are operators of vehicles and must comply with all traffic laws. Cycle Oregon reserves the right to expel any participant who demonstrates a reluctance to ride in a safe and lawful manner. Riders who violate safety laws in the Oregon motor vehicle code are also subject to citation by law enforcement officials.
  5. The Cycle Oregon course is open from 7 a.m.– 6 p.m. Course support vehicles and other support services are available only during course hours. Any cyclist(s) still on the course after 6 p.m. will be offered a ride to camp; if you choose not to take it you are on your own to get into camp, and no course support services will be available for those who choose to stay out on the course after 6 p.m.
  6. SAG support is to be used for mechanical and/or medical reasons.  Excessive use of SAG support (3 or more times) for any other reason may exclude participants from registering for future Cycle Oregon events.
  7. The course will be clearly marked. If you leave the official course, you are not part of the ride and will not receive any services or support.
  8. We try to direct as much vehicle traffic as possible off the route. Nevertheless, the tour travels on public highways. Therefore, ride no more than two abreast. Ride beside a pal only where it is safe to do so, and where you do not block traffic or force other riders to swing far out to pass.
  9. Never draft behind a vehicle. Pacelines are prohibited in areas of high vehicle or cyclist traffic, and are limited in size to a maximum of seven riders. Be especially careful at railroad tracks, cattle guards and busy intersections. Course monitors and safety vehicles may be stationed in areas of special concern.
  10. Call “ON YOUR LEFT” to alert a rider you intend to pass. The call “CAR BACK” passes the message forward when a vehicle is approaching from behind. Use arm signals to indicate turns. Point out potholes, broken glass and other hazards to those behind you. Signal your intention to stop, and pull off the roadway.
  11. Use of iPods and similar musical devices while riding on Cycle Oregon is highly discouraged. Safe group riding in an event such as Cycle Oregon depends on communication between cyclists. iPods interfere with that process and make it difficult for people to hear instructions such as “CAR BACK” and “ON YOUR LEFT.” iPods also make it difficult to hear approaching cars or trucks, negatively impacting the safety of cyclists and motorists.
  12. Cycle Oregon enjoys a reputation for leaving our campsites, lunch spots, rest stops and course spotless. Please dispose of all trash and recyclables in the appropriate places.
  13. Cyclists must keep the roadway clear when stopping at an event-designated stop or any other location.  Please ensure that bicycles are parked off the road and that cyclists do not congregate on the roadways.
  14. Cycle Oregon includes at least two roadside water stops each day, along with assorted drinks at meals and all rest stops. Still, the responsibility for carrying sufficient water and remaining properly hydrated is yours. Make sure you drink extra fluids before, during and after the ride to reduce the risk of dehydration. While in the saddle, you should consume an average of one liter of fluid for each hour of riding. Drink before you become thirsty. By the time you feel thirsty, you are already slightly dehydrated. Muscle cramping can also be a sign of dehydration. If at anytime you run low on water, signal a SAG van with a “thumbs down” and ask for a fill-up. Do not be tempted by roadside rivers and streams, as the water may contain bacteria or parasites.